The experience of the great war

Part 1 Part 1 Narrator:

The experience of the great war

Part 1 Part 1 Narrator: In the summer ofat docks up and down the eastern seaboard, thousands of American soldiers boarded ships bound for France. They were the vanguard of a new American army, about to enter the most destructive war the world had ever known. The United States goes from being the country on the other side of the ocean to being the preeminent world power.

This is the birth of the on-going debate over how involved America should be in the world. The troops were drawn from every corner of the country, and reflected the teeming diversity of turn-of-the-century America.

Helen Zoe Veit, Historian: In many ways World War I forced Americans to ask what are we as a country?

The experience of the great war

Who are we as a people? All across the country, communities staged elaborate celebrations to send their men off to war. But underneath the calls for unity, Americans were deeply divided. World War I showed Americans the best and worst that the country is capable of.

The Great War: Part 3 | American Experience | PBS

It lays bare questions the Americans continue to ask themselves for the rest of the 20th century. This was a period of deep paranoia in this country.

The experience of the great war

Women who refused to set aside their campaign for suffrage because of the war were set upon by mobs and carted off to prison. African-American men joined in a war for freedom abroad, while being denied it at home.

The war galvanizes African Americans, not just to fight for their country, but to fight for their rights as American citizens. When the ships let loose their lines and headed out to sea, the troops on board were entering a conflict of unprecedented bloodshed and suffering, one that had come to be known as The Great War.

Dan Carlin, Podcast Producer: Crowds were flocking to theaters to see the newest film by Charlie Chaplin. A loaf of bread cost six cents.

Inthe nation boasted a population of almost a hundred million people. A third of them were immigrants, or had parents who had been born abroad. And one out of three Americans lived on farms.

Women could vote, but only in twelve states of the union. In the South, African Americans had virtually no political rights at all. Europe was a one-week steamship voyage away. In the United States was the largest producer of steel. It had the biggest transportation network.

It had more energy resources. It had the second biggest population in the western world saving only Russia. But the American people as a whole were quite ambivalent about whether or not they actually wanted to become one of the great powers that arbitrated the destinies of the world at large.

I think that Wilson had, even in this vision of America as a moral beacon in the world, as a city upon a hill, this sense that Americans had something to give to the world.

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Germany was led by a kaiser, Russia a tsar. Great Britain and France, two democracies, jealously guarded far-flung colonial empires.‘’The experience of the Great War stripped men of their masculinity’’explore the ways in which Barker, Sassoon and Owen portray this in their writing.

Sassoon and Owen as poets and Barker as a novelist, explore through their works of literature the changing and challenging notions of masculinity experienced as a result of The Great War.

In a war that saw new weaponry technology and great numbers of casualties, Assistant Professor Vanda Wilcox considers the common experiences of soldiers in active combat. The men and women who served in the First World War endured some of the most brutal forms of warfare ever known. This documentary is amazingly detailed and provides in-depth and comprehensive information on America's role in the First World War.

"The Great War" forever reshaped the map of the world, changed the role of the United States in the world and began the modern era of world history.

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These changes however came at a horrible price. American Experience: The Great War The Great War tells the rich and complex story of World War I through the voices of nurses, journalists, aviators and the American troops who came to be known as "doughboys." The series explores the experiences of African-American and Latino soldiers, suffragists, Native American "code talkers" and others .

‘’The experience of the Great War stripped men of their masculinity’’explore the ways in which Barker, Sassoon and Owen portray this in their writing. Sassoon and Owen as poets and Barker as a novelist, explore through their works of literature the changing and challenging notions of masculinity experienced as a result of The Great War.

Experience of the Great War of Interpretations of the experience of the Great War of expressed in various media. Art. Our page of links to websites with online images, biographical detail and primary sources for the study of First World War art and artists.

Watch The Great War | American Experience | Official Site | PBS