Identify how teachers can select adapt and sequence curricular materials for effective instruction o

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Identify how teachers can select adapt and sequence curricular materials for effective instruction o

To achieve this challenging, sometimes controversial task of curriculum alignment and revision, school leaders must work with diverse constituencies to achieve the best balance of needs, desires, appropriate assessment, and instruction.

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Achieving effective curriculum revision, therefore, requires a thorough understanding of the processes and principles of the changing paradigms affecting curriculum development. Determining what these needs are, how to address them, and how to revise established curriculum often rests in the laps of many building level administrators.

Often these building principals find themselves at the center of a controversy they did not want, do not deserve, and cannot fix. Many times these same educational leaders have not had adequate preparation for, nor do they have a full understanding of, what is expected, with regard to the curriculum revision project.

This demand for change to meet the needs of a 2lst century educational program is challenging even the best educational leaders.

Teachers, community leaders, and students were not necessarily ready for a curriculum revision projectand the need for such a process was certainly not a priority in the minds of many.

As a small rural district without a curriculum coordinator, the building principals were given the responsibility for achieving the goal of developing an effective curriculum revision program which would meet the needs of a 2lst century workforce.

As in so many cases of effective educational change, need born of necessity created this study, the results, and the subsequent recommendations for effective curriculum revision Summary: Review of Literature Within the literature on curricular revision, three major premises were identified.

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First, the society and culture served by an educational community dictate the needs, obligations, and responsibilities expected of the educational program. Second, society perpetuates itself with educational programming, i. Third, systemic change, as in the form of transitioning educational curriculum, is often difficult at best and controversial at worst.

These three elements combine to offer a strong foundation from which educators can begin to address what is taught at all levels, the needs of a respondent society, and the changing roles of classroom practitioners.

Facing the Achievement Gap

As noted above, the society and culture served by an educational community dictate the needs, obligations, and responsibilities expected of the educational program. Likewise, Glatthorn l offered that beliefs and behaviors of each ethnic group or geographical area were developed in order to foster and teach children specific skills necessary for the transition from childhood to adulthood, thereby sustaining or advancing the convictions of that culture.

It is obvious, therefore, that the curriculum must meet the needs and current demands of the culture, the society, and the expectations of the population being served.

To this end, the educational reform process is still undergoing review, revision, and constant change. Also noted above, society perpetuates itself with educational programming, i. Borrowman l stated that education is the process by which individuals gain knowledge, skills, values, habits, and attitudes.

Societal mores, cultural norms, and practical needs compel the incorporation of various components of learning and information. Finally, as noted earlier, systemic change, as in the form of transitioning educational curriculum, is often a challenge to all concerned and in some cases, may even create a negative, divisive environment.

It is an accepted fact that without acceptance and buy-in by all major constituencies, long-lasting systemic change cannot occur. Cited by Beyer and Liston lJames B. Concurring with these views that change was not only necessary but imminent, Scott l declared that curriculum revision projects of the past twenty years had in reality been dismal failures with a high cost to taxpayers, students, and educators.

Monson and Monson l presented the need for collaborative, sanctioned revision by all stakeholders with an emphasis on the performance of teacher leaders.

It has been suggested that the educational community must include those not usually considered to be at the leading edge of school reform initiatives.Given that prospective teachers often rely heavily on curricular materials to guide their preparation and teaching, they will also need experiences in analyzing and revising curricular materials using standards- and research-based criteria [, ].

Given that prospective teachers often rely heavily on curricular materials to guide their preparation and teaching, they will also need experiences in analyzing and revising curricular materials using standards- and research-based criteria [, ]. SPED A Chapter 9. STUDY. PLAY. Instructional modifications. The way that you select and sequence instructional examples. also can affect how easily your students learn. In effective instruction, ideas are clearly tied together, which enables students to understand them more easily. -Questions on the procedures teachers use to identify scope and sequence of the curriculum and to plan units and lessons that align with required content standards. -Questions on how student characteristics affect instructional planning decisions.

An approach in which teachers vary and adapt instruction based on the individual needs of students in the classroom; examples of how to differentiate instruction include flexible grouping and immediate corrective feedback (e.g., scaled models, tactile materials).

Teachers can also maximize students' access by using appropriate scaffolds and. develop these abilities through instruction based on Best Practice teaching strategies. affords them the opportunity to identify topics, develop questions, plan inquiry, divide tasks, A differentiated curriculum is one where teachers adapt the curriculum .

curriculum and instruction. Cognitively guided instruction In effective classrooms students’ sense of autonomy and efficacy are developed through explicit instruction on cognitive strategies. Teaching cognitive strategies scaffolds In technology -enriched instruction teachers use multimedia and other technology to.

Identify how teachers can select adapt and sequence curricular materials for effective instruction o

How do teachers identify materials and resources that meet the needs of all learners in the classroom? 8. How do teachers adjust and adapt learning materials for diverse learners?

9.

Identify how teachers can select adapt and sequence curricular materials for effective instruction o

How do teachers collect data to demonstrate that students are making progress in language and How do teachers select effective materials to teach concepts and.

Teachers indicated that “identify, revise, experience, and review” would be a much more effective method of actually revising the “taught” curriculum than the .

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